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Next Big Idea: 3-D Printing on Paper

Mcor Technologies' 3-D printers use ordinary, everyday reams of office paper, stacked and printed in full, high-res color and cut into intricate 3-D shapes.

Unlike the trend in 3-D printing that uses a variety of materials, Mcor Technologies' printers use paper.  Ordinary, everyday reams of office paper, stacked and printed in full, high-res color and cut into intricate 3-D shapes.

That technique remains one of the most original and potentially disruptive systems in an industry defined by disruption.

IndustryWeek  talked with Mcor's co-founder and CEO, Conor MacCormack, to find out what makes this technology work and where it is going next. The first question was why paper?

We wanted to be completely opposite everybody else. We really wanted to upset the  status quo and build a machine that people wouldn't have to  worry about hitting print anymore.

So we said, let's build a machine that is almost free to run, plus one that used one of the most accessible material that anybody can get their hands on. Materials that they wouldn't have to wait for stock to come in. What could anybody get easily? Reams of paper.

More on Mcor’s 3-D printing on IndustryWeek.com

IndustryWeek is an NED companion site within Penton’s Manufacturing & Supply Chain Group.

 

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