Two-Male-Scientists-Working-In-Lab

How Eastman Chemical Co. Updated Its Emergency Communications

At the company's Kingsport, Tenn., location, with more than 900 acres, 575 buildings and 10,000 employees and contractors on premise, there is a lot at stake when an emergency hits.

Eastman Chemical Co. has solved the problem by modernizing its emergency communications with a network-based mass notification system that uses multiple devices and redundant communication methods that can be activated through a single click of a button.

Eastman produces a broad range of advanced materials, additives and functional products, specialty chemicals and fibers, and has a history of a strong safety culture. At our Kingsport, Tenn., location, with more than 900 acres, 575 buildings and 10,000 employees and contractors on premise, there is a lot at stake when an emergency hits. The modern emergency notification system we use is equipped to execute the primary objective for emergency management: Get help to those who need it, send warnings to steer the plant population away from danger and return the situation to normal as quickly as possible.

Things were different three years ago, when we were faced with three dying alerting technologies that needed extensive modernization: radios, pagers and a copper-hardwired, ring-down phone system that nearly was obsolete. Inspired by new technology platforms, IP-based systems and the use of mobile connected devices, we saw the need for a new alerting and communications platform that seamlessly would integrate our legacy devices, take advantage of new capabilities and position us for future advances. One of our overarching goals was to keep emergency notifications simple by operating through a single interface that would reach all devices with very concise and consistent messages.

More on Eastman’s improved communication program on EHS Today. .

EHS Today is an NED companion site within Penton’s Manufacturing & Supply Chain Group.

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish