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Siemens Invests $660 Million for Manufacturing Education in Massachusetts

The company will provide in-kind software grants for manufacturing programs at vocational high schools, technical community colleges and universities throughout Massachusetts.

Explaining that manufacturing in America is on the rise and “being transformed by a software revolution that is enhancing productivity, increasing efficiency and speeding time to market, " Siemens announced on April 16 that it was investing nearly $669 million in education in Massachusetts.

The company will provide in-kind software grants for manufacturing programs at vocational high schools, technical community colleges and universities throughout Massachusetts.

“In Massachusetts, manufacturing is the top contributor of gross state product, employing more than 250,000 people,” said Chuck Grindstaff, CEO, Siemens PLM Software. “This revolution requires a highly trained workforce. Thanks to support of MassMEP, MACWIC and Siemens MT Worcester, Massachusetts schools will integrate world-class PLM technology into their curriculum, so that students are even better prepared for high quality manufacturing jobs.”

The series of in-kind grants was established as a result of an industry need for skilled workers identified through the Massachusetts Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MassMEP) and the Manufacturing Advancement Center Workforce Innovation Collaborative (MACWIC), an alliance of next-generation companies working to provide employer-led workforce training initiatives.

Siemens Metals Technologies business, with its advanced manufacturing facility located in Worcester, is a founding member of MACWIC and serves on the steering committee. The academic partnerships are designed to support MACWIC’s Applied Manufacturing Technology Certification Pathway, an advanced manufacturing certification program.

“Formerly, competition in manufacturing was determined by capital investment and low labor costs. Today’s manufacturing competitiveness is being determined by a skilled and technology enabled workforce capable of creating value in both processes and products,” said Jack Healy, director of operations for MassMEP. “Educating people for this type of workforce has always been a race between education and technology. Siemens through this initiative is allowing our state’s education system to catch up in this race by providing students the opportunity to participate in the unlimited challenge that will be offered for the next generation of manufacturers.”

As software plays an increasing role in the next era of manufacturing, students and faculty will use the software in assignments and research related to computer-aided-design, engineering simulation, industrial design, digital manufacturing and manufacturing management. The in-kind grant will also help to expand and modernize manufacturing curriculum in design and process technologies

Worcester regions and state of Massachusetts who rely on Siemens’ PLM and CAD software including employers such as: Reebok, Textron, Raytheon and Midstate Berkshire.

Governor Deval Patrick has said that the state expects to fill 100,000 jobs in manufacturing over the next decade.

“Manufacturing is the most sophisticated, forward-looking and innovative business function in the world today and we need to let students, parents and administrators know what these jobs look like and what students need to learn in order to get them,” said Eric Spiegel, president and CEO, Siemens USA. “This partnership can serve as an economic catalyst for the region, the state and the country.”

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